Carolyn Loeb

Associate Professor

Carolyn Loeb is an art and architectural historian interested in art’s complex and multi-voiced (and sometimes zany) dialogue with social realities. She joined the RCAH after teaching for many years in the art department at Central Michigan University, where her courses focused on modern and contemporary art, women and art, and modern architecture. In 1994 she taught in the Midwest Consortium for Study Abroad’s Vienna Program, where the city itself was the classroom. Carolyn’s research focuses on themes in architectural history. Her interest in housing is reflected in Entrepreneurial Vernacular: Developers’ Subdivisions in the 1920s (Johns Hopkins Press, 2001) as well as in work on the municipal housing of Red Vienna. Recently she has been studying aspects of redevelopment in reunified Berlin. She has written on housing in East Berlin, planning decisions in the zone where the Wall formerly stood, redevelopment’s theoretical and historical underpinnings, and the relationship of contemporary public sculpture in Berlin to urban history, public space, memory, and redevelopment.

CV

BIO

Carolyn Loeb is an art and architectural historian interested in art’s complex and multi-voiced (and sometimes zany) dialogue with social realities. She joined the RCAH after teaching for many years in the art department at Central Michigan University, where her courses focused on modern and contemporary art, women and art, and modern architecture. In 1994 she taught in the Midwest Consortium for Study Abroad’s Vienna Program, where the city itself was the classroom. Carolyn’s research focuses on themes in architectural history. Her interest in housing is reflected in Entrepreneurial Vernacular: Developers’ Subdivisions in the 1920s (Johns Hopkins Press, 2001) as well as in work on the municipal housing of Red Vienna. Recently she has been studying aspects of redevelopment in reunified Berlin. She has written on housing in East Berlin, planning decisions in the zone where the Wall formerly stood, redevelopment’s theoretical and historical underpinnings, and the relationship of contemporary public sculpture in Berlin to urban history, public space, memory, and redevelopment.

CV

CONTACT INFO

Office: C230B Snyder Hall
Phone: (517) 884-1322

HIGHLIGHTS

PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York
MA, San Francisco State University
BA, University of California, Berkeley