Dylan A. T. Miner

Associate Professor

Dylan A.T. Miner is a Wiisaakodewinini (Métis) artist, activist, and scholar. He is Director of the American Indian Studies Program and Associate Professor in the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities. Miner is also adjunct curator of Indigenous art at the MSU Museum, a founding member of the Justseeds artists collective, and on the board of the Michigan Indian Education Council. Miner holds a PhD from The University of New Mexico and has published approximately sixty journal articles, book chapters, critical essays, and encyclopedia entries. In 2010, he was granted an Artist Leadership Fellowship from the National Museum of the American Indian (Smithsonian Institution). Miner has been featured in more than twenty solo exhibitions – with five more planned in 2015-16 – and has been artist-in-residence at institutions such as the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, École supérieure des beaux-arts in Nantes, Klondike Institute of Art and Culture, Rabbit Island, Santa Fe Art Institute, and numerous universities, art schools, and low-residency MFA programs. His book Creating Aztlán: Chicano Art, Indigenous Sovereignty, and Lowriding Across Turtle Island was published in 2014 by the University of Arizona Press (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies series), while his solo exhibition Silence of Sovereignty opened this year in Montréal and Winnipeg. Miner is currently completing two book projects: Indigenous Aesthetics: Art, Activism, Autonomy (Bloomsbury, expected 2016) and a collection of poetry, Ikidowinan Ninanda-gikendan (words I must learn).

 

Biographie en français

Biografía en español

 

CV

CV (short)

Academia.edu site

 

Recent Courses Taught:

RCAH 192 -- First-Year Seminar: Art + Activism (spring 2011)
RCAH 292B -- Indigenous Solidarity Work: Civic Engagement in Urban Native Communities (spring 2011)
RCAH 290 -- Sophomore Tutorial in Radical Youth Subcultures: Do It Yourself Ourselves (fall 2010)
RCAH 291 -- Creative Workshop: Art as Social Justice (fall 2010)
RCAH 330 -- Contemporary Indigenous Knowledge (fall 2010)

 

Selected Publications:

2014

Creating Aztlán: Chicana/o Art, Radical Politics and Indigenous Utopianism (Tucson: University of Arizona Press).

“Indigenous Aesthetics.”  Michael Kelly, ed.  Encyclopedia of Aesthetics, second and revised edition (New York and Oxford: University of Oxford Press).

“Straddling la otra frontera: Revisioning Chicana/o Art History Through MiChicana/o Visual Culture,” Jennifer A. González, Tere Romo, Chon Noriega and Ondine Chavoya, eds.  Chicana/o Art: A Critical Anthology (Durham, NC: Duke University Press).  Reprint from Aztlán: The Journal of Chicano Studies; forthcoming.

 

2013

“Stories as Mshkiki: Reflections on the Healing and Migratory Practices of Minwaajimo,” Jill Doerfler, Niigonwedom James Sinclair, and Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark, eds.  Centering Anishinaabeg Studies: Understanding the World Through Stories (East Lansing: Michigan State University Press).

“Teaching ‘Art as Social Justice’: Developing Prefigurative Pedagogies.”  International Journal of Education and the Arts Volume 14 Number 2 (Special Issue on Social Justice).

 

2012

Halfbreed Theory: Maria Campbell’s Storytelling as Indigenous Knowledge and une Petite Michin,” Jolene Armstrong, ed.  Maria Campbell: Essays on Her Work (Toronto: Guernica Editions, distributed by University of Toronto Press).

“Aztlán, Anishinaabewaki, Ixachilan: Radical Hemispheric Indigeneity and the Liberation of Art through the Graphic Work of Carlos Cortéz Koyokuikatl,”  Arturo J. Aldama, M. Bianet Castellanos, and Lourdes Gutiérrez Nájera, eds.  Comparative Indigeneities of the Américas (Tucson: University of Arizona Press).

“Radical Migrations through Anishinaabewaki: An Indigenous Re-Mapping of the Great Lakes.” Rozalinda Burcila, Bonnie Fortune, and Sarah Ross, eds.  Deep Routes: The Midwest in All Directions (Chicago: Compass Collaborations).

Hasta la Victoria (Deportista) Siempre: Revolution, Art, and the Representation of Sport in Cuban Visual Culture,” Mike O’Mahony and Mike Huggins, eds.  The Visual in Sport (New York: Routledge).  Reprint from International Journal of the History of Sport.

 

2011

Justseeds (Dylan Miner and Roger Peet, eds.) Refuge: A Migratory and Momentary Guide to the City (Ljubljana, Slovenia: Likovne Besde, Ljubljana Personal series).

Hasta la Victoria (Deportista) Siempre: Revolution, Art, and the Representation of Sport in Cuban Visual Culture,” International Journal of the History of Sport 28: 8-9 (May-June 2011): 1283-1300. 

 

2009

“Provocations on Sneakers: The Multiple Meanings of Athletic Shoes, Sport, Race, and Masculinity,” CR: The New Centennial Review 9, vol. 2: 73-108.

 

2008

“Straddling la otra frontera: Revisioning Chicana/o Art History Through MiChicana/o Visual Culture,”Aztlán: The Journal of Chicano Studies (Spring): 89-122.

 

2005

El renegado comunista: Diego Rivera, la Liga de Obreros y Campesinos and Mexican Repatriation in Detroit,” Third Text, November 2005: 647-660.

 

Selected Solo Exhibitions:

2015

Cape Breton University Art Gallery, Canada
Yellowknife Artist-Run Centre, Canada (Exhibition and Residency)
Manitoba Printmakers Association, Canada

 

2014

Weisman Art Museum, University of Minnesota, USA
Klondike Institute of Art and Culture, Canada

 

2013

University of Iowa Museum of Art, USA
Santa Fe Art Institute, USA
Flint Public Art Project, USA

 

2012

Gallery 101, Ottawa, Canada *

Small Projects, Norway *

Tamástslikt Cultural Institute, USA

 

2011

Fort Lewis College, USA
Galería América, Univ. of Notre Dame,
USA (exhibitions extended to Crossroads Gallery,
University of Notre Dame)
Alma College, USA
Michigan Institute for Contemporary Art, USA
Urban Shaman Gallery, Canada
Ziibiwing Center, USA
Central Michigan University (2-person)

 

2010

Cleveland State University, USA
College for Creative Studies, USA
Saginaw Valley State University, USA
ARC Gallery, Chicago, USA

See video

BIO

Dylan A.T. Miner is a Wiisaakodewinini (Métis) artist, activist, and scholar. He is Director of the American Indian Studies Program and Associate Professor in the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities. Miner is also adjunct curator of Indigenous art at the MSU Museum, a founding member of the Justseeds artists collective, and on the board of the Michigan Indian Education Council. Miner holds a PhD from The University of New Mexico and has published approximately sixty journal articles, book chapters, critical essays, and encyclopedia entries. In 2010, he was granted an Artist Leadership Fellowship from the National Museum of the American Indian (Smithsonian Institution). Miner has been featured in more than twenty solo exhibitions – with five more planned in 2015-16 – and has been artist-in-residence at institutions such as the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, École supérieure des beaux-arts in Nantes, Klondike Institute of Art and Culture, Rabbit Island, Santa Fe Art Institute, and numerous universities, art schools, and low-residency MFA programs. His book Creating Aztlán: Chicano Art, Indigenous Sovereignty, and Lowriding Across Turtle Island was published in 2014 by the University of Arizona Press (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies series), while his solo exhibition Silence of Sovereignty opened this year in Montréal and Winnipeg. Miner is currently completing two book projects: Indigenous Aesthetics: Art, Activism, Autonomy (Bloomsbury, expected 2016) and a collection of poetry, Ikidowinan Ninanda-gikendan (words I must learn).

 

Biographie en français

Biografía en español

 

CV

CV (short)

Academia.edu site

 

Recent Courses Taught:

RCAH 192 -- First-Year Seminar: Art + Activism (spring 2011)
RCAH 292B -- Indigenous Solidarity Work: Civic Engagement in Urban Native Communities (spring 2011)
RCAH 290 -- Sophomore Tutorial in Radical Youth Subcultures: Do It Yourself Ourselves (fall 2010)
RCAH 291 -- Creative Workshop: Art as Social Justice (fall 2010)
RCAH 330 -- Contemporary Indigenous Knowledge (fall 2010)

 

Selected Publications:

2014

Creating Aztlán: Chicana/o Art, Radical Politics and Indigenous Utopianism (Tucson: University of Arizona Press).

“Indigenous Aesthetics.”  Michael Kelly, ed.  Encyclopedia of Aesthetics, second and revised edition (New York and Oxford: University of Oxford Press).

“Straddling la otra frontera: Revisioning Chicana/o Art History Through MiChicana/o Visual Culture,” Jennifer A. González, Tere Romo, Chon Noriega and Ondine Chavoya, eds.  Chicana/o Art: A Critical Anthology (Durham, NC: Duke University Press).  Reprint from Aztlán: The Journal of Chicano Studies; forthcoming.

 

2013

“Stories as Mshkiki: Reflections on the Healing and Migratory Practices of Minwaajimo,” Jill Doerfler, Niigonwedom James Sinclair, and Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark, eds.  Centering Anishinaabeg Studies: Understanding the World Through Stories (East Lansing: Michigan State University Press).

“Teaching ‘Art as Social Justice’: Developing Prefigurative Pedagogies.”  International Journal of Education and the Arts Volume 14 Number 2 (Special Issue on Social Justice).

 

2012

Halfbreed Theory: Maria Campbell’s Storytelling as Indigenous Knowledge and une Petite Michin,” Jolene Armstrong, ed.  Maria Campbell: Essays on Her Work (Toronto: Guernica Editions, distributed by University of Toronto Press).

“Aztlán, Anishinaabewaki, Ixachilan: Radical Hemispheric Indigeneity and the Liberation of Art through the Graphic Work of Carlos Cortéz Koyokuikatl,”  Arturo J. Aldama, M. Bianet Castellanos, and Lourdes Gutiérrez Nájera, eds.  Comparative Indigeneities of the Américas (Tucson: University of Arizona Press).

“Radical Migrations through Anishinaabewaki: An Indigenous Re-Mapping of the Great Lakes.” Rozalinda Burcila, Bonnie Fortune, and Sarah Ross, eds.  Deep Routes: The Midwest in All Directions (Chicago: Compass Collaborations).

Hasta la Victoria (Deportista) Siempre: Revolution, Art, and the Representation of Sport in Cuban Visual Culture,” Mike O’Mahony and Mike Huggins, eds.  The Visual in Sport (New York: Routledge).  Reprint from International Journal of the History of Sport.

 

2011

Justseeds (Dylan Miner and Roger Peet, eds.) Refuge: A Migratory and Momentary Guide to the City (Ljubljana, Slovenia: Likovne Besde, Ljubljana Personal series).

Hasta la Victoria (Deportista) Siempre: Revolution, Art, and the Representation of Sport in Cuban Visual Culture,” International Journal of the History of Sport 28: 8-9 (May-June 2011): 1283-1300. 

 

2009

“Provocations on Sneakers: The Multiple Meanings of Athletic Shoes, Sport, Race, and Masculinity,” CR: The New Centennial Review 9, vol. 2: 73-108.

 

2008

“Straddling la otra frontera: Revisioning Chicana/o Art History Through MiChicana/o Visual Culture,”Aztlán: The Journal of Chicano Studies (Spring): 89-122.

 

2005

El renegado comunista: Diego Rivera, la Liga de Obreros y Campesinos and Mexican Repatriation in Detroit,” Third Text, November 2005: 647-660.

 

Selected Solo Exhibitions:

2015

Cape Breton University Art Gallery, Canada
Yellowknife Artist-Run Centre, Canada (Exhibition and Residency)
Manitoba Printmakers Association, Canada

 

2014

Weisman Art Museum, University of Minnesota, USA
Klondike Institute of Art and Culture, Canada

 

2013

University of Iowa Museum of Art, USA
Santa Fe Art Institute, USA
Flint Public Art Project, USA

 

2012

Gallery 101, Ottawa, Canada *

Small Projects, Norway *

Tamástslikt Cultural Institute, USA

 

2011

Fort Lewis College, USA
Galería América, Univ. of Notre Dame,
USA (exhibitions extended to Crossroads Gallery,
University of Notre Dame)
Alma College, USA
Michigan Institute for Contemporary Art, USA
Urban Shaman Gallery, Canada
Ziibiwing Center, USA
Central Michigan University (2-person)

 

2010

Cleveland State University, USA
College for Creative Studies, USA
Saginaw Valley State University, USA
ARC Gallery, Chicago, USA

CONTACT INFO

Office: C230J Snyder Hall
Phone: (517) 884-1323

HIGHLIGHTS

PhD, New Mexico
MA, New Mexico
BA, Western Michigan